Despite the gloom, it is Freezeout

The fog froze in layers to the antenna and windshield as Freezeout Lake came into view, and a a flock of 200 Snow Geese cross overhead. These were the last Snow Geese that we would see for the next couple of hours. The weather man completely lied. His prediction of mid-50s with sunny skies had turned into 30 degrees with freezing fog and mist. The geese blew out in the dawn twilight and they stayed dispersed out in the fields. We eventually found a group of several thousand in a field with a couple of Sandhill Cranes. This pattern was repeating 4 times through the day. Among the white geese, there were roughly 0.5 percent blue phase geese and one Ross’s Goose.

In-bound Snow Geese

In-bound Snow Geese

Miniature version of the classic V

Miniature version of the classic V

Scores of feeding Snow Geese

Scores of feeding Snow Geese

Landing gear extended

Landing gear extended

The ponds were filled with Tundra Swans, and my estimate was around 3,000 of the lovely white beasts. Even in these numbers, the pair bonds were obvious as they were almost always in the company of their favorite other swan.

The swan way of saying "Come here often?"

The swan way of saying "Come here often?"

Eloquence in white

Eloquence in white

Even though we missed the colossal numbers of 100,000 or more, Freezeout and the Snow Geese is one my birding highlights every year.

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Written by Radd Icenoggle

I am a native Montanan, who has spent a lifetime as an outdoors and wildlife enthusiast. I earned a degree in biology with an emphasis on habitat relations. During my studies, I had the great fortune to research and compose a thesis that explored the effects of slope aspect on...
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1 Comment

P

I see these fellas when they hit Rondeau Provincial Park on Lake Erie.. they make such a noise, you can hear it for kms away! Amazing sight, seeing thousands of them in Rondeau Bay 🙂

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