Glen Lake Hike or the 5.4 Mile Hurdles

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” maptype=”TERRAIN” z=”14″ gpx=”http://radleyice.com/wp-content/uploads/Glen Lake.gpx”]

The trail that leads to Glen Lake weaves mostly through the remains of the Gash Creek Fire, which fiercely burned through the lodgepole pines. The fire left almost every tree standing as a ghostly spire, and many of those have started to fall. The fallen timber is turning the trail into a 5.4 mile series of hurdles (a great workout!).

Glen Lake itself sits in a higher basin that still has remnants of last year’s snowpack clinging to the slopes above the crystal clear waters. Olive-sided Flycatchers were singing with their “quick three beers“. A pair of mule deer bound with grace over the fallen trunks and boulders. I sat for awhile, and admired the clarity of the water, being able to make out the bottom at a great distance.

Glen Lake Trailhead

Glen Lake Trailhead

Gash Creek Fire map

Gash Creek Fire map

The escort Dusky Grouse

The escort Dusky Grouse

Trail weaving through the post-fire forest

Trail weaving through the post-fire forest

Acres and acres of standing dead lodgepole pines

Acres and acres of standing dead lodgepole pines

The 5.4 Mile Hurdles

The 5.4 Mile Hurdles

Bitterroot Valley from the ridge above Glen Lake

Bitterroot Valley from the ridge above Glen Lake

The remains of the Gash Creek Wildfire

The remains of the Gash Creek Wildfire

Gash Point through the charred  trunks

Gash Point through the charred trunks

Glen Lake

Glen Lake

The clear waters of Glen Lake

The clear waters of Glen Lake

The Ru

The Ru

Birds Observed

Species Count
Dusky Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus)

3

Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi)

2

Western Wood-Pewee (Contopus sordidulus)

1

Hammond’s Flycatcher (Empidonax hammondii)

1

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)

3

Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)

2

Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli)

2

Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)

1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)

2

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides)

6

Townsend’s Solitaire (Myadestes townsendi)

3

Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus)

8

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata)

2

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)

4

Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)

1

Red Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra)

4

Written by Radd Icenoggle

I am a native Montanan, who has spent a lifetime as an outdoors and wildlife enthusiast. I earned a degree in biology with an emphasis on habitat relations. During my studies, I had the great fortune to research and compose a thesis that explored the effects of slope aspect on...
Read more

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *